Meeting Complex Communication Needs Associated With Genetic Syndromes: A Call to Interprofessional Education and Practice Effective communication is a significant challenge for many persons with genetic syndromes. Too often intellectual, sensory, and/or physical limitations interact to create overwhelmingly complex clinical scenarios. Faced with addressing daunting needs, providers can feel both unprepared and inadequate. This issue of Perspectives identifies complexities associated with many genetic syndromes and ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2015
Meeting Complex Communication Needs Associated With Genetic Syndromes: A Call to Interprofessional Education and Practice
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Billy T. Ogletree
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, North Carolina
  • Disclosure: Financial: Billy T. Ogletree has no financial interests to disclose.
    Disclosure: Financial: Billy T. Ogletree has no financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Billy T. Ogletree has no nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Billy T. Ogletree has no nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2015
Meeting Complex Communication Needs Associated With Genetic Syndromes: A Call to Interprofessional Education and Practice
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, June 2015, Vol. 24, 67-73. doi:10.1044/aac24.3.67
History: Received December 8, 2014 , Revised March 20, 2015 , Accepted March 20, 2015
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, June 2015, Vol. 24, 67-73. doi:10.1044/aac24.3.67
History: Received December 8, 2014; Revised March 20, 2015; Accepted March 20, 2015

Effective communication is a significant challenge for many persons with genetic syndromes. Too often intellectual, sensory, and/or physical limitations interact to create overwhelmingly complex clinical scenarios. Faced with addressing daunting needs, providers can feel both unprepared and inadequate. This issue of Perspectives identifies complexities associated with many genetic syndromes and promotes interprofessional education/collaborative practice for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and other health and educational professionals charged with this group's care. While the issue includes several papers that discuss “syndrome-specific” challenges and solutions, this article describes interprofessional education and practice and provides a reasoned argument for their application in the delivery of AAC services for individuals with genetic syndromes who have the most complex communication needs. A brief illustrative case example is provided describing an interprofessional education (IPE) educational unit dedicated to cross-disciplinary AAC instruction.

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