Interprofessional Practice in Developing an AAC System for Children With Down Syndrome Down Syndrome (DS) is the most common known genetic origin of intellectual disability (Shin et al., 2009). Although the oral language skills of very young children with DS are often sufficient to meet their communicative needs within the supportive social circles of home and preschool, the task of communication becomes ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2015
Interprofessional Practice in Developing an AAC System for Children With Down Syndrome
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Krista Wilkinson
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, The Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA
  • Ji Young Na
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, The Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA
  • Disclosure: Financial: Krista Wilkinson and Ji Young Na have no financial interests to disclose.
    Disclosure: Financial: Krista Wilkinson and Ji Young Na have no financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: The data on perimeter arrangement has been presented orally at a variety of conferences but not otherwise published.
    Nonfinancial: The data on perimeter arrangement has been presented orally at a variety of conferences but not otherwise published.×
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2015
Interprofessional Practice in Developing an AAC System for Children With Down Syndrome
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, June 2015, Vol. 24, 114-122. doi:10.1044/aac24.3.114
History: Received December 10, 2014 , Revised March 30, 2015 , Accepted April 2, 2015
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, June 2015, Vol. 24, 114-122. doi:10.1044/aac24.3.114
History: Received December 10, 2014; Revised March 30, 2015; Accepted April 2, 2015

Down Syndrome (DS) is the most common known genetic origin of intellectual disability (Shin et al., 2009). Although the oral language skills of very young children with DS are often sufficient to meet their communicative needs within the supportive social circles of home and preschool, the task of communication becomes far more demanding upon entrance to elementary school. The speech that was previously adequate is often not sufficient for academic communication with unfamiliar partners; indeed, 95% of parents report that their children with DS had difficulty being understood by persons outside their immediate social circle (Kumin, 2002). Principles of interprofessional approaches are critical in serving individuals with DS because of the diverse and unique profile of strengths and challenges. We will use a case-based approach to illustrate how the principles of interprofessional practices can benefit AAC interventions for individuals with DS. We focus in particular on how expertise of professionals in education/counseling, vision science, and motor development can inform AAC interventions.

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