Reading, Writing and AAC: Mobile Technology Strategies for Literacy and Language Development Mobile technology (e.g., tablets, smartphones) continues to take public school and overall therapeutic environments by storm. The merging of mobile technology and augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) can be a relatively low-cost solution for individuals with communication impairments. Still, practitioners need to be equipped to make informed decisions about when, ... Article
Article  |   January 01, 2015
Reading, Writing and AAC: Mobile Technology Strategies for Literacy and Language Development
Author Notes
  • Disclosures: Financial: Kerry Davis and Sean Sweeney have no financial interests to disclose.
    Disclosures: Financial: Kerry Davis and Sean Sweeney have no financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Kerry Davis has no nonfinancial interests to disclose. Sean Sweeney has previously published in this topic. Some of these works are referenced in this piece.
    Nonfinancial: Kerry Davis has no nonfinancial interests to disclose. Sean Sweeney has previously published in this topic. Some of these works are referenced in this piece.×
Article Information
Development / Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Normal Language Processing / Articles
Article   |   January 01, 2015
Reading, Writing and AAC: Mobile Technology Strategies for Literacy and Language Development
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, January 2015, Vol. 24, 19-25. doi:10.1044/aac24.1.19
History: Received October 3, 2014 , Revised December 23, 2014 , Accepted March 1, 2015
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, January 2015, Vol. 24, 19-25. doi:10.1044/aac24.1.19
History: Received October 3, 2014; Revised December 23, 2014; Accepted March 1, 2015

Mobile technology (e.g., tablets, smartphones) continues to take public school and overall therapeutic environments by storm. The merging of mobile technology and augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) can be a relatively low-cost solution for individuals with communication impairments. Still, practitioners need to be equipped to make informed decisions about when, how, and why specific mobile technologies and related applications might support a child's language, literacy, and academic skills, possibly in conjunction with AAC. Language and literacy development are a critical aspect of a speech-language pathologist's scope of practice (American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2007). Therefore, when considering mobile technologies for learning, the practitioner needs to consider the interplay between reading, writing, and communication. For children with complex communication profiles, speech-language pathologists can use mobile technologies as a powerful means to foster communication, language, and literacy skills.

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