Mobile Technologies as Cognitive-Behavioral Aids The advent of personal digital assistants (PDAs) at the turn of this century opened new doors to functional independence for people with cognitive impairment. Pocket-sized electronic reminders helped people keep appointments, take medications on time, and move from task to task across a busy day, often without the need for ... Article
Article  |   June 2014
Mobile Technologies as Cognitive-Behavioral Aids
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Tony Gentry
    Department of Occupational Therapy, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA
  • Disclosure: Tony Gentry is an associate professor at Virginia Commonwealth University, where he directs the Assistive Technology for Cognition Laboratory.
    Disclosure: Tony Gentry is an associate professor at Virginia Commonwealth University, where he directs the Assistive Technology for Cognition Laboratory.×
  • Nonfinancial: Tony Gentry has no financial relationships related to the contents of this article.
    Nonfinancial: Tony Gentry has no financial relationships related to the contents of this article.×
  • Copyright © 2014 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   June 2014
Mobile Technologies as Cognitive-Behavioral Aids
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, June 2014, Vol. 23, 148-156. doi:10.1044/aac23.3.148
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, June 2014, Vol. 23, 148-156. doi:10.1044/aac23.3.148

The advent of personal digital assistants (PDAs) at the turn of this century opened new doors to functional independence for people with cognitive impairment. Pocket-sized electronic reminders helped people keep appointments, take medications on time, and move from task to task across a busy day, often without the need for human supervision. As these tools have evolved into smartphones and tablets sporting multiple applications (apps), their uses as assistive technology have expanded to behavioral coaching, augmentative communication, and telehealth purposes, among many others. With so many choices, selecting an appropriate device and app suite for a particular user can seem daunting, but a stepwise, theoretically-based assessment process, a focus on essential intervention strategies, and a willingness to adapt to new devices and changing user needs, can provide important supports for people with cognitive-behavioral challenges.

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