Principles of App Selection and Training After Brain Injury The growing popularity of using mainstream smart devices as assistive technology for cognition (ATC) is having a significant impact in the daily lives of individuals living with brain injury. With more than 60 percent of the mobile market using smart devices, it is becoming more common for individuals to have ... Article
Article  |   June 2014
Principles of App Selection and Training After Brain Injury
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michelle R. Wild
    McKay Moore Sohlberg
  • Disclosures: Financial: Michelle R. Wild has previously published a book on this topic; it is not referenced in this text. McKay Sohlberg has no financial interests to disclose.
    Disclosures: Financial: Michelle R. Wild has previously published a book on this topic; it is not referenced in this text. McKay Sohlberg has no financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Michelle R. Wild and McKay Sohlberg have no nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Michelle R. Wild and McKay Sohlberg have no nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
  • Copyright © 2014 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Articles
Article   |   June 2014
Principles of App Selection and Training After Brain Injury
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, June 2014, Vol. 23, 140-147. doi:10.1044/aac23.3.140
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, June 2014, Vol. 23, 140-147. doi:10.1044/aac23.3.140

The growing popularity of using mainstream smart devices as assistive technology for cognition (ATC) is having a significant impact in the daily lives of individuals living with brain injury. With more than 60 percent of the mobile market using smart devices, it is becoming more common for individuals to have their own smart devices. However, the devices are often underutilized and are not being used in a way conducive to benefiting individuals postinjury. Although brain injury professionals play a significant role in the selection and training of devices and apps, the sheer number of apps and the time required to select and train others to use them present major obstacles to the broad adoption of these devices in the therapeutic environment. The purpose of this article is to provide a framework for selecting and training the use of apps that helps clients with cognitive impairments function more optimally in their day-to-day lives. We present 4 questions to help identify training and instructional needs of clients. In addition, we discuss training templates and learning tools that can be used by therapists to facilitate app training within clinical sessions as well as by clients and/or caregivers outside the clinical environment.

Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.