AAC Decision-Making and Mobile Technology: Points to Ponder The purpose of this article is to outline a decision-making process and highlight which portions of the augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) evaluation process deserve special attention when deciding which features are required for a communication system in order to provide optimal benefit for the user. The clinician then will ... Article
Article  |   April 2014
AAC Decision-Making and Mobile Technology: Points to Ponder
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mary Ann Abbott
    Ontario Montclair School District, Ontario, CA
    California State University, Los Angeles, CA
  • Debby McBride
    AAC TechConnect, Inc., Evergreen, CO
  • Disclosures: Financial: Mary Ann Abbott previously consulted with AAC TechConnect, but is no longer doing so. Debbie McBride is the owner of AAC TechConnect.
    Disclosures: Financial: Mary Ann Abbott previously consulted with AAC TechConnect, but is no longer doing so. Debbie McBride is the owner of AAC TechConnect.×
  • Nonfinancial: Mary Ann Abbott and Debby McBride have no nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Mary Ann Abbott and Debby McBride have no nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Articles
Article   |   April 2014
AAC Decision-Making and Mobile Technology: Points to Ponder
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, April 2014, Vol. 23, 104-111. doi:10.1044/aac23.2.104
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, April 2014, Vol. 23, 104-111. doi:10.1044/aac23.2.104

The purpose of this article is to outline a decision-making process and highlight which portions of the augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) evaluation process deserve special attention when deciding which features are required for a communication system in order to provide optimal benefit for the user. The clinician then will be able to use a feature-match approach as part of the decision-making process to determine whether mobile technology or a dedicated device is the best choice for communication. The term mobile technology will be used to describe off-the-shelf, commercially available, tablet-style devices like an iPhone®, iPod Touch®, iPad®, and Android® or Windows® tablet.

Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.