The Role of Photographs in Face-to-Face Interactions involving Younger and Older Neurotypical Adults The purpose of this preliminary investigation was to explore the role photographs play in communication interactions involving neurotypical adults. Participants included 10 people from 2 age groups: younger adults between 23 and 25 years of age and older adults between 61 and 74 years of age. Referencing photographs to support ... Article
Article  |   January 01, 2014
The Role of Photographs in Face-to-Face Interactions involving Younger and Older Neurotypical Adults
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Katlyn Engebretsen
    University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Lincoln, NE
  • Rachel Hartman
    University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Lincoln, NE
  • David Beukelman
    University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Lincoln, NE
  • Karen Hux
    University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Lincoln, NE
  • Disclosure: Financial: Katlyn Engebretsen, Rachel Hartman, David Beukelman, and Karen Hux have no financial interests to disclose.
    Disclosure: Financial: Katlyn Engebretsen, Rachel Hartman, David Beukelman, and Karen Hux have no financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Katlyn Engebretsen, Rachel Hartman, David Beukelman, and Karen Hux have no nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Katlyn Engebretsen, Rachel Hartman, David Beukelman, and Karen Hux have no nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Normal Language Processing / Articles
Article   |   January 01, 2014
The Role of Photographs in Face-to-Face Interactions involving Younger and Older Neurotypical Adults
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, January 2014, Vol. 23, 55-59. doi:10.1044/aac23.1.55
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, January 2014, Vol. 23, 55-59. doi:10.1044/aac23.1.55

The purpose of this preliminary investigation was to explore the role photographs play in communication interactions involving neurotypical adults. Participants included 10 people from 2 age groups: younger adults between 23 and 25 years of age and older adults between 61 and 74 years of age. Referencing photographs to support one-on-one conversations between an examiner and either a younger or older neurotypical adult speaker occurred approximately 20% of the time. Younger participants relied solely on nonverbal communication in the form of a pointing gesture to convey their intent less than 2% of the time, whereas older participants never relied solely on pointing gestures to convey intent. This suggests that typical speakers treat the referencing of photographs as a supplemental rather than primary communication strategy during face-to-face interactions.

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