Case Studies for Telepractice in AAC As the field of telepractice grows, perceived barriers to service delivery must be anticipated and addressed in order to provide appropriate service delivery to individuals who will benefit from this model. When applying telepractice to the field of AAC, additional barriers are encountered when clients with complex communication needs are ... Article
Article  |   January 01, 2014
Case Studies for Telepractice in AAC
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Tanya Rose Curtis
    AugCom Solutions, LLC, Sheridan, MT
  • Disclosure: Financial: Tanya Rose Curtis was contracted to provide training services for Words+ Inc., whose products are discussed in the article, during the project reported in this article. Since that time, she has subsequently become an employee of Words+ Inc.
    Disclosure: Financial: Tanya Rose Curtis was contracted to provide training services for Words+ Inc., whose products are discussed in the article, during the project reported in this article. Since that time, she has subsequently become an employee of Words+ Inc.×
  • Nonfinancial: Tanya Rose Curtis has no nonfinancial issues to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Tanya Rose Curtis has no nonfinancial issues to disclose.×
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Articles
Article   |   January 01, 2014
Case Studies for Telepractice in AAC
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, January 2014, Vol. 23, 42-54. doi:10.1044/aac23.1.42
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, January 2014, Vol. 23, 42-54. doi:10.1044/aac23.1.42

As the field of telepractice grows, perceived barriers to service delivery must be anticipated and addressed in order to provide appropriate service delivery to individuals who will benefit from this model. When applying telepractice to the field of AAC, additional barriers are encountered when clients with complex communication needs are unable to speak, often present with severe quadriplegia and are unable to position themselves or access the computer independently, and/or may have cognitive impairments and limited computer experience. Some access methods, such as eye gaze, can also present technological challenges in the telepractice environment. These barriers can be overcome, and telepractice is not only practical and effective, but often a preferred means of service delivery for persons with complex communication needs.

Acknowledgements
Words+ Inc. provided funding and technical assistance for the telepractice project.
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