Clinical Aspects Related to Tele-AAC: A Technical Report Tele-AAC is a method of service delivery in which professionals provide intervention, assessment, and consultation services through the use of telecommunication technologies to individuals who use augmentative communication systems. In response to the nationwide shortage of highly trained speech-language pathologists, tele-AAC has emerged as a viable way to reach underserved ... Article
Article  |   January 01, 2014
Clinical Aspects Related to Tele-AAC: A Technical Report
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nerissa Hall
    Commūnicāre, LLC, Ludlow, MA
  • Michelle Boisvert
    Worldtide, Inc., Williamsburg, MA
  • Disclosure: Financial: Nerissa Hall and Michelle Boisvert have no financial interests to disclose.
    Disclosure: Financial: Nerissa Hall and Michelle Boisvert have no financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Prior to working independently, Nerissa Hall and Michelle Boisvert were doctoral students at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, funded by a grant awarded to Dr. Mary Andrianopoulos by the U.S. Department of Education. Michelle Boisvert is the editor of ASHA SIG 18, Perspectives on Telepractice.
    Nonfinancial: Prior to working independently, Nerissa Hall and Michelle Boisvert were doctoral students at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, funded by a grant awarded to Dr. Mary Andrianopoulos by the U.S. Department of Education. Michelle Boisvert is the editor of ASHA SIG 18, Perspectives on Telepractice.×
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Articles
Article   |   January 01, 2014
Clinical Aspects Related to Tele-AAC: A Technical Report
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, January 2014, Vol. 23, 18-33. doi:10.1044/aac23.1.18
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, January 2014, Vol. 23, 18-33. doi:10.1044/aac23.1.18

Tele-AAC is a method of service delivery in which professionals provide intervention, assessment, and consultation services through the use of telecommunication technologies to individuals who use augmentative communication systems. In response to the nationwide shortage of highly trained speech-language pathologists, tele-AAC has emerged as a viable way to reach underserved clients. This paper examines the clinical aspects related to tele-AAC, including required and supplementary technology/equipment, resources and personnel needed, training, and quality assurance considerations. In addition, the infrastructure necessary to deliver the range of synchronous and asynchronous tele-AAC services is discussed.

Acknowledgement
A special thanks to Prentke Romich Company for loaning devices to Hall and Boisvert for clinical research and application purposes. Prior to working independently, Hall and Boisvert were doctoral students at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, funded by a grant awarded to Dr. Mary Andrianopoulos by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (CFDA 84.325D, H325D080042).
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