Pointing Forward: Typing for Academic Access For students who do not demonstrate reliable verbal speech, utilization of augmentative and alternative communication, both low-tech and high-tech, can be an effective way of engaging meaningfully in the academic and social opportunities of the classroom. This article discusses the benefits of drawing on a variety of communication supports, including ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2013
Pointing Forward: Typing for Academic Access
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Christine Ashby
    Teaching and Leadership, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY
  • Christi Kasa
    Department of Special Education, University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs, CO
  • Disclosure: Financial: Christine Ashby is an Assistant Professor in the Teaching and Leadership Department of the School of Education at Syracuse University and the Director of the Institute on Communication and Inclusion. Christi Kasa is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Special Education at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs.
    Disclosure: Financial: Christine Ashby is an Assistant Professor in the Teaching and Leadership Department of the School of Education at Syracuse University and the Director of the Institute on Communication and Inclusion. Christi Kasa is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Special Education at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs.×
    Nonfinancial: Christine Ashby has previously published in the subject area. Christi Kasa has previously published in the subject area.
    Nonfinancial: Christine Ashby has previously published in the subject area. Christi Kasa has previously published in the subject area.×
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2013
Pointing Forward: Typing for Academic Access
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, October 2013, Vol. 22, 143-156. doi:10.1044/aac22.3.143
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, October 2013, Vol. 22, 143-156. doi:10.1044/aac22.3.143
Abstract

For students who do not demonstrate reliable verbal speech, utilization of augmentative and alternative communication, both low-tech and high-tech, can be an effective way of engaging meaningfully in the academic and social opportunities of the classroom. This article discusses the benefits of drawing on a variety of communication supports, including typing to communicate, and outlines key principles and practices for the successful inclusion of students who type in academic classes. Key principles include universal design, presuming competence, writing effective IEP goals, and successful classroom strategies.

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