Teaching Partners to Support Communication for Adults with Acquired Communication Impairment For adults with acquired communication impairment, particularly those who have communication disorders associated with stroke or neurodegenerative disease, communication partners play an important role in establishing and maintaining communicative competence. In this paper, we assemble some evidence on this topic and integrate it with current preferred practice patterns (American Speech-Language-Hearing ... Article
Article  |   April 2013
Teaching Partners to Support Communication for Adults with Acquired Communication Impairment
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Laura J. Ball
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
  • Joanne Lasker
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Emerson College, Boston, MA
  • Disclosure: Laura Ball has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Laura Ball has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • Disclosure: Joanne Lasker has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Joanne Lasker has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • © 2013 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Language Disorders
Article   |   April 2013
Teaching Partners to Support Communication for Adults with Acquired Communication Impairment
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, April 2013, Vol. 22, 4-15. doi:10.1044/aac22.1.4
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, April 2013, Vol. 22, 4-15. doi:10.1044/aac22.1.4

For adults with acquired communication impairment, particularly those who have communication disorders associated with stroke or neurodegenerative disease, communication partners play an important role in establishing and maintaining communicative competence. In this paper, we assemble some evidence on this topic and integrate it with current preferred practice patterns (American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2004). Our goals are to help speech-language pathologists (SLPs) identify and describe partner-based communication strategies for adults with acquired impairment, implement evidence-based approaches for teaching strategies to communication partners, and employ a Personnel Framework (Binger et al., 2012) to clarify partners? roles in acquiring and supporting communication tools for individuals with acquired impairments. We offer specific guidance about AAC techniques and message selection for communication partners involved with chronic, degenerative, and end of life communication. We discuss research and provide examples of communication partner supports for person(s) with aphasia and person(s) with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis who have complex communication needs.

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