A Systems Approach to Training Potential Communication Partners of People With Aphasia Experts have recommended communication partner training as an effective method of improving skills of communication partners and supporting communication of people with aphasia (Simmons-Mackie, Raymer, Armstrong, Holland & Cherney, 2010). Such training involves learning about aphasia, types of communication supports (e.g., low-tech, high-tech), and strategies for facilitating communication. Although much ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2013
A Systems Approach to Training Potential Communication Partners of People With Aphasia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nina Simmons-Mackie
    Department of Health & Human Sciences, Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond, LA
  • Disclosure: Nina Simmons-Mackie has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Nina Simmons-Mackie has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Language Disorders / Aphasia
Article   |   April 01, 2013
A Systems Approach to Training Potential Communication Partners of People With Aphasia
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, April 2013, Vol. 22, 21-29. doi:10.1044/aac22.1.21
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, April 2013, Vol. 22, 21-29. doi:10.1044/aac22.1.21

Experts have recommended communication partner training as an effective method of improving skills of communication partners and supporting communication of people with aphasia (Simmons-Mackie, Raymer, Armstrong, Holland & Cherney, 2010). Such training involves learning about aphasia, types of communication supports (e.g., low-tech, high-tech), and strategies for facilitating communication. Although much of this literature addresses the training of regular, familiar partners, there is evidence that “potential” communication partners can be trained to support communication with unfamiliar people with aphasia (e.g., training health care providers to communicate with patients with aphasia). However, direct training sessions with potential partners does not ensure that partners will implement these support practices in day-to-day activities in organizations such as those associated with health care, government, or business. Rather, experts must take a systems approach if communication support is to be supported by and included in organizational policy and practice. In this article, I describe a systems approach to implementing evidence-based practices in organizations.

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