Meeting the Needs of Limited English Proficiency Patients The number of patients in U.S. hospitals with limited English proficiency (LEP) is growing. There is a body of evidence that suggests that inadequate patient-provider communication is responsible for a range of adverse events, including death. In recognition of this, the Joint Commission has set standards requiring hospitals to address ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2013
Meeting the Needs of Limited English Proficiency Patients
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Richard Hurtig
    Department of Communications Sciences & Disorders, College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
  • Emily Czerniejewski
    Department of Communications Sciences & Disorders, College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
  • Laura Bohnenkamp
    Department of Communications Sciences & Disorders, College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
  • Jiyoung Na
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA
  • Disclosure: Richard Hurtig has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Richard Hurtig has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • Disclosure: Emily Czerniejewski has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Emily Czerniejewski has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • Disclosure: Laura Bohnenkamp has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Laura Bohnenkamp has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • Disclosure: Jiyoung Na has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Jiyoung Na has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Healthcare Settings / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2013
Meeting the Needs of Limited English Proficiency Patients
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, June 2013, Vol. 22, 91-101. doi:10.1044/aac22.2.91
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, June 2013, Vol. 22, 91-101. doi:10.1044/aac22.2.91
Abstract

The number of patients in U.S. hospitals with limited English proficiency (LEP) is growing. There is a body of evidence that suggests that inadequate patient-provider communication is responsible for a range of adverse events, including death. In recognition of this, the Joint Commission has set standards requiring hospitals to address the communication needs of the diverse hospitalized population. Although the optimal approach for LEP patients would involve having certified interpreters at the bedside around the clock, this is unfortunately not practically or economically feasible. Speech-generating devices (SGDs) can offer patients a means of communicating with their caregivers and an opportunity to participate more actively in their care. The University of Iowa Assistive Devices Lab has developed a series of bilingual communication templates suited for use in acute and critical care settings. They developed these templates for use by LEP patients who are speakers of diverse languages, as well as by Deaf patients who use a sign language as their primary means of communication.

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