Remote Instruction of Potential AAC Support Personnel Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) facilitators and general interventionists support individuals who rely on AAC to meet their communication needs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of an instructional strategy for potential AAC facilitators to operate and maintain high technology AAC device software using Remote Access ... Article
Article  |   September 2011
Remote Instruction of Potential AAC Support Personnel
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Emily Quinn
    Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC
  • David Beukelman
    University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Lincoln, NE
  • Amber Thiessen
    University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Lincoln, NE
  • Copyright © 2011 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Articles
Article   |   September 2011
Remote Instruction of Potential AAC Support Personnel
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, September 2011, Vol. 20, 97-101. doi:10.1044/aac20.3.97
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, September 2011, Vol. 20, 97-101. doi:10.1044/aac20.3.97
Acknowledgment
This research project was supported in part by the Barkley Trust and the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Communication Enhancement (AAC-RERC) and is funded under grant #H133E080011 from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) in the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS). In terms of disclosure Dr. Beukelman contributed to the design features included in the Visual Scene Display application used in this research. The authors alone are responsible for the content and writing of the article.
Abstract

Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) facilitators and general interventionists support individuals who rely on AAC to meet their communication needs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of an instructional strategy for potential AAC facilitators to operate and maintain high technology AAC device software using Remote Access Error-Free (RA-EF) instruction. During the RA-EF condition, the researcher and participant were in two different locations. The results of this investigation revealed that, following fewer than 30 minutes of instruction focusing on 11 operational skills, a group of 10 participants who were unfamiliar with the Visual Scenes Display for Aphasia application (Version 2) achieved post-instruction accuracy scores of 98.2%.

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