Article  |   December 2012
Peer-Mediated AAC Instruction for Young Children With Autism and other Developmental Disabilities
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathy Thiemann-Bourque
    Juniper Gardens Children’s Project,University of Kansas, Kansas City. MO
  • Disclosure: Kathy Thiemann-Bourque has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Kathy Thiemann-Bourque has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / Language Disorders / Social Communication & Pragmatics Disorders
Article   |   December 2012
Peer-Mediated AAC Instruction for Young Children With Autism and other Developmental Disabilities
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication December 2012, Vol.21, 159-166. doi:10.1044/aac21.4.159
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication December 2012, Vol.21, 159-166. doi:10.1044/aac21.4.159

Many young children with developmental disabilities (DD) have significant delays in social, communication, and play skills. For those children learning to use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), successful social interactions with peers will require explicit instruction on the same system for both communication partners. Peer-mediated (PM) interventions are recommended best practice based on more than 30 years of research with young children with autism and other DDs. Integrating direct AAC instruction within PM programs to advance social reciprocity in typical preschool routines is a necessary and important next step for young AAC users. In this article, I will summarize the design and outcomes of two PM AAC studies documenting positive social outcomes for preschool children with severe autism. I will also highlight strategies to recruit peers without disabilities, teach peer partners how to use AAC systems (e.g., Picture Exchange Communication System [PECS], Speech Generating Devices [SGDs]), and engineer the preschool classroom for successful AAC communication. I will describe data collection procedures for measuring changes in reciprocal child and peer social communication interactions.

Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access

Related Articles

From the Coordinator
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication December 2012, Vol.21, 123. doi:10.1044/aac21.4.123
Overheard: Partnering to Make AAC Work Better for Kids With ASDs
The ASHA Leader April 2013, Vol.18, 16-17. doi:10.1044/leader.OV.18042013.16
Increasing Social Interaction Using Prelinguistic Milieu Teaching With Nonverbal School-Age Children With Autism
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology August 2013, Vol.22, 489-502. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2012/10-0103)
Enhanced Milieu Teaching: Incorporating AAC Into Naturalistic Teaching With Young Children and Their Partners
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication April 2013, Vol.22, 37-50. doi:10.1044/aac22.1.37
Using Standards-Based Instruction To Teach Language to Children Who Use AAC
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication September 2012, Vol.21, 92-98. doi:10.1044/aac21.3.92