Stakeholders as Partners: Making AAC Work Better Challenges associated with the provision of AAC treatment can be daunting, especially in light of the intense training requirements of many populations. Stakeholder training can optimize treatment efforts led by speech-language pathologists (SLP) and result in co-training relationships where the SLP and stakeholder appreciate and adapt to family and other ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2012
Stakeholders as Partners: Making AAC Work Better
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Billy T. Ogletree
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, NC
  • Disclosure: Billy T. Ogletree has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Billy T. Ogletree has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2012
Stakeholders as Partners: Making AAC Work Better
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, December 2012, Vol. 21, 151-158. doi:10.1044/aac21.4.151
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, December 2012, Vol. 21, 151-158. doi:10.1044/aac21.4.151
Abstract

Challenges associated with the provision of AAC treatment can be daunting, especially in light of the intense training requirements of many populations. Stakeholder training can optimize treatment efforts led by speech-language pathologists (SLP) and result in co-training relationships where the SLP and stakeholder appreciate and adapt to family and other variables that often impact treatment success. In this article, I will provide a brief review of concepts and literature central to the use of stakeholders as trainers, discuss benefits of stakeholder involvement in training including a heightened awareness of family systems and events, and present a short illustrative case describing a successful AAC treatment where stakeholder training was implemented. I will introduce the concept of AAC stakeholders as trainers and the reader will learn about the Communication Partner Instruction model (Kent-Walsh & McNaughton, 2005) as a possible vehicle for training.

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