AAC Collaboration Using the Self-Anchored Rating Scales (SARS): An Aphasia Case Study The self-anchored rating scale (SARS) is a technique that augments collaboration between Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) interventionists, their clients, and their clients' support networks. SARS is a technique used in Solution-Focused Brief Therapy, a branch of systemic family counseling. It has been applied to treating speech and language disorders ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2012
AAC Collaboration Using the Self-Anchored Rating Scales (SARS): An Aphasia Case Study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lynn E. Fox
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Portland State University, Portland, Oregon
  • Disclosure: Lynn E. Fox is a volunteer consultant with Personal Technologies Inc., which manufactures Coglink adapted e-mail software.
    Disclosure: Lynn E. Fox is a volunteer consultant with Personal Technologies Inc., which manufactures Coglink adapted e-mail software.×
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2012
AAC Collaboration Using the Self-Anchored Rating Scales (SARS): An Aphasia Case Study
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, December 2012, Vol. 21, 136-143. doi:10.1044/aac21.4.136
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, December 2012, Vol. 21, 136-143. doi:10.1044/aac21.4.136
Abstract

The self-anchored rating scale (SARS) is a technique that augments collaboration between Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) interventionists, their clients, and their clients' support networks. SARS is a technique used in Solution-Focused Brief Therapy, a branch of systemic family counseling. It has been applied to treating speech and language disorders across the life span, and recent case studies show it has promise for promoting adoption and long-term use of high and low tech AAC. I will describe 2 key principles of solution-focused therapy and present 7 steps in the SARS process that illustrate how clinicians can use the SARS to involve a person with aphasia and his or her family in all aspects of the therapeutic process. I will use a case study to illustrate the SARS process and present outcomes for one individual living with aphasia.

Acknowledgements
I wish to thank the individuals referred to as Dave, Stan, and Megan who agreed to participate in the therapy sessions described in this article. I'd also like to extend thanks to Lisa Stember, Pam Griffith, and the staff of Kampfe Management Services for their support of this work.
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