Addressing the Content Vocabulary With Core: Theory and Practice for Nonliterate or Emerging Literate Students In the early elementary grades, the primary emphasis is on developing skills crucial to future academic and personal success—specifically oral and written communication skills. These skills are vital to student success as well as to meaningful participation in the classroom and interaction with peers. Children with complex communication needs (CCN) ... Article
Article  |   September 01, 2012
Addressing the Content Vocabulary With Core: Theory and Practice for Nonliterate or Emerging Literate Students
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Debbie Witkowski
    Semantic Compaction Systems, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Bruce Baker
    Semantic Compaction Systems, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Disclosure: Debbie Witkowski has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Debbie Witkowski has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • Disclosure: Bruce Baker is the Founder and President of Semantic Compaction Systems
    Disclosure: Bruce Baker is the Founder and President of Semantic Compaction Systems×
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   September 01, 2012
Addressing the Content Vocabulary With Core: Theory and Practice for Nonliterate or Emerging Literate Students
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, September 2012, Vol. 21, 74-81. doi:10.1044/aac21.3.74
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, September 2012, Vol. 21, 74-81. doi:10.1044/aac21.3.74
Abstract

In the early elementary grades, the primary emphasis is on developing skills crucial to future academic and personal success—specifically oral and written communication skills. These skills are vital to student success as well as to meaningful participation in the classroom and interaction with peers. Children with complex communication needs (CCN) may require the use of high-performance speech generating devices (SGDs). The challenges for these students are further complicated by the task of learning language at a time when they are expected to apply their linguistic skills to academic tasks. However, by focusing on core vocabulary as a primary vehicle for instruction, educators can equip students who use SGDs to develop language skills and be competitive in the classroom. In this article, we will define core vocabulary and provide theoretical and practical insights into integrating it into the classroom routine for developing oral and written communication skills.

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