Impact of Computerized “Sounding out” on Spelling Performance of a Child Who Uses AAC: A Preliminary Report Spelling is a vital skill for people who rely on augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). The ability to spell words provides an opportunity to create novel and spontaneous communication and increases educational, social, and employment opportunities for children and adults. However, many children and youth who rely on AAC struggle ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2011
Impact of Computerized “Sounding out” on Spelling Performance of a Child Who Uses AAC: A Preliminary Report
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jillian H. McCarthy
    Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE
    Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN
  • David R. Beukelman
    Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE
  • Tiffany P. Hogan
    Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE
Article Information
Development / Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2011
Impact of Computerized “Sounding out” on Spelling Performance of a Child Who Uses AAC: A Preliminary Report
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, December 2011, Vol. 20, 119-124. doi:10.1044/aac20.4.119
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, December 2011, Vol. 20, 119-124. doi:10.1044/aac20.4.119
Abstract

Spelling is a vital skill for people who rely on augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). The ability to spell words provides an opportunity to create novel and spontaneous communication and increases educational, social, and employment opportunities for children and adults. However, many children and youth who rely on AAC struggle to gain functional spelling skills and written language. The purpose of this preliminary investigation was to develop a strategy to provide auditory letter-sounds using commercially available computer equipment and to evaluate how such a computerized “sounding out” strategy influences spelling accuracy for one child who required AAC support. The spelling accuracy of both consonants and vowels increased during intervention sessions when individual sounds associated with target words were provided compared to the baseline session when individual sounds were not provided. Future directions are discussed.

Acknowledgments
This research project was supported in part by the Barkley Trust, Nebraska Speech-Language-Hearing Endowment (NSLHE) Fund Grant 2010, and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) National Institute for Deafness and Communication Disorders (NIDCD) Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Pre-doctoral Fellowship (NIH F31 DC010965-02). The authors alone are responsible for the content and writing of the article. The opinions contained in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Institutes of Health
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