Using Video Modeling Intervention and Speech Generating Devices To Teach Requesting Behaviors to Persons With Autism One of the instructional techniques reported in the literature to teach communication skills to persons with autism is video modeling (VM). VM is a form of observational learning that involves watching and imitating the desired target behavior(s) exhibited by the person on the videotape. VM has been used to teach ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2011
Using Video Modeling Intervention and Speech Generating Devices To Teach Requesting Behaviors to Persons With Autism
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Karen Copple
    Lubbock Early Childhood Intervention, Lubbock, TX
  • Rajinder Koul
    Department of speech, language and hearing services, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX
  • Devender Banda
    Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX
  • Ellen Frye
    Lubbock Independent School District, Lubbock, TX
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2011
Using Video Modeling Intervention and Speech Generating Devices To Teach Requesting Behaviors to Persons With Autism
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, December 2011, Vol. 20, 109-113. doi:10.1044/aac20.4.109
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, December 2011, Vol. 20, 109-113. doi:10.1044/aac20.4.109
Abstract

One of the instructional techniques reported in the literature to teach communication skills to persons with autism is video modeling (VM). VM is a form of observational learning that involves watching and imitating the desired target behavior(s) exhibited by the person on the videotape. VM has been used to teach a variety of social and communicative behaviors to persons with developmental disabilities such as autism. In this paper, we describe the VM technique and summarize the results of two single-subject experimental design studies that investigated the acquisition of spontaneous requesting skills using a speech generating device (SGD) by persons with autism following a VM intervention. The results of these two studies indicate that a VM treatment package that includes a SGD as one of its components can be effective in facilitating communication in individuals with autism who have little or no functional speech.

Acknowledgment
Portions of this paper are based on Karen Copple's (2011) dissertation “An Examination of the Effectiveness of Video Modeling Intervention Using a Speech Generating Device in Preschool Children with Autism” submitted to Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center.
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