“If Mama Ain't Happy, Ain't Nobody Happy”: Collaborating With Families in AAC Interventions With Infants and Toddlers The colloquialism “If Mama ain’t happy, ain’t nobody happy.” is perhaps the clearest, most concise, and accurate rationale available for family collaboration in early intervention programs. Whether actually the mother, father, biological relative, friend, professional, or a combination thereof, the primary caregiver or caregivers of an infant or toddler are ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2003
“If Mama Ain't Happy, Ain't Nobody Happy”: Collaborating With Families in AAC Interventions With Infants and Toddlers
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Delva Culp
    University of Texas at Dallas/Callier Center, Dallas, TX
    Coordinator for the Augmentative Communication Team
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2003
“If Mama Ain't Happy, Ain't Nobody Happy”: Collaborating With Families in AAC Interventions With Infants and Toddlers
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, December 2003, Vol. 12, 3-9. doi:10.1044/aac12.5.3-a
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, December 2003, Vol. 12, 3-9. doi:10.1044/aac12.5.3-a
The colloquialism “If Mama ain’t happy, ain’t nobody happy.” is perhaps the clearest, most concise, and accurate rationale available for family collaboration in early intervention programs. Whether actually the mother, father, biological relative, friend, professional, or a combination thereof, the primary caregiver or caregivers of an infant or toddler are typically devoted to the well-being of that child. If a primary caregiver does not feel that the child is receiving support and moving forward, it is unlikely that the family unit or intervention will proceed harmoniously and productively.
During the last two decades, AAC intervention has increasingly attended to family involvement and early intervention. Numerous professionals have acknowledged the importance of family participation in AAC interventions (Angelo, 1995; Beukelman & Mirenda, 1998; Blischak, Lombardino & Dysoon, 2003; Bruno & Dribbon, 1998; Culp, 1995; Culp & Carlisle, 1988; Light, Parsons & Drager, 2002). Angelo (1995, p. 194) affirms, “Parent and family involvement in AAC programs is desirable, if not essential for achieving successful outcomes.”
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