Early Intervention and AAC Assessment Resources For young children with severe communication disorders, appropriate assessment is crucial to providing services that meet the needs of the individual child. Over the past two decades, an increasing number of assessment recourses have come available both for early intervention as well as for augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). This ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2003
Early Intervention and AAC Assessment Resources
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lisa A. Wood
    Southwest Missouri State University, Springfield, MO
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2003
Early Intervention and AAC Assessment Resources
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, December 2003, Vol. 12, 12-13. doi:10.1044/aac12.5.12
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, December 2003, Vol. 12, 12-13. doi:10.1044/aac12.5.12
For young children with severe communication disorders, appropriate assessment is crucial to providing services that meet the needs of the individual child. Over the past two decades, an increasing number of assessment recourses have come available both for early intervention as well as for augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). This brief article will provide information and resources both for AAC assessment as well as early intervention. In summary, the similarities in the assessment of these two areas will be discussed.
In summarizing the literature on communication assessment of infants and toddlers, Crais (1995)  noted that both families and professionals have indicated dissatisfaction with the methods and tools used in assessment. (See Crais, 1995  for additional information on this topic.) Crais (1995)  examined the reasons for this dissatisfaction and provided guidelines for selection of assessment tools for the birth-three population. Some of the important characteristics of early intervention assessment advocated by Crais (1995)  included: opportunities for child initiations, focus on preverbal communication, focus on communicative functions, focus on social-affective behaviors, profile of strengths and needs within communication, documentation of emerging skills, correspondence to day-to day activities, active role of caregiver, inclusion of caregiver in assessment, dynamic assessment process, caregiver validating findings, allowing individual variation, and prediction of later communication. In addition, Crais (1995)  looked at a variety of assessment tools and considered whether each of the tools meets each of the listed characteristics.
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