Developing an Intervention Strategy to Replace Challenging Behavior Used to Escape Undesired Activities: A Case Example Children and adults who engage in severe challenging behavior frequently produce forms of behavior that result in injury to themselves or to others, disrupt or damage their physical environments, and decrease engagement in activities that develop and exercise adaptive living skills (Doss & Reichle, 1991). For specialists in the field ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2001
Developing an Intervention Strategy to Replace Challenging Behavior Used to Escape Undesired Activities: A Case Example
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Patti Dropik
    Department of Communication Disorders, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
  • Joe Reichle
    Department of Communication Disorders, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2001
Developing an Intervention Strategy to Replace Challenging Behavior Used to Escape Undesired Activities: A Case Example
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, March 2001, Vol. 10, 8-10. doi:10.1044/aac10.1.8
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, March 2001, Vol. 10, 8-10. doi:10.1044/aac10.1.8
Children and adults who engage in severe challenging behavior frequently produce forms of behavior that result in injury to themselves or to others, disrupt or damage their physical environments, and decrease engagement in activities that develop and exercise adaptive living skills (Doss & Reichle, 1991). For specialists in the field of AAC, these behaviors pose unique challenges in assessment and intervention planning.
For many individuals, challenging behavior is socially motivated. That is, behavior is reinforced or maintained by the mediation of other individuals. Social functions include (a) obtaining or maintaining attention; (b) escaping persons, objects or activities; and (c) gaining access to preferred items and activities. Frequently, the individual’s behavior requires comprehensive interventions that foster the acquisition of new, more socially appropriate communicative forms and that increase participation in a variety of daily activities (Horner & Carr, 1997).
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