Using Functional Behavioral Assessment and Functional Communication Training to Assess and Prevent Challenging Behavior The ultimate goal of any educator must be to provide opportunities for children to succeed. For most children, the regular curriculum, along with teacher support, is sufficient to meet this goal. However, for some children, additional help is critical. Unfortunately, even the best-intended plans may go awry if educators must ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2001
Using Functional Behavioral Assessment and Functional Communication Training to Assess and Prevent Challenging Behavior
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mary A. McEvoy
    Center for Early Education and Development, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
  • Shelley L. Neilsen
    Center for Early Education and Development, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2001
Using Functional Behavioral Assessment and Functional Communication Training to Assess and Prevent Challenging Behavior
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, March 2001, Vol. 10, 6-8. doi:10.1044/aac10.1.6
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, March 2001, Vol. 10, 6-8. doi:10.1044/aac10.1.6
The ultimate goal of any educator must be to provide opportunities for children to succeed. For most children, the regular curriculum, along with teacher support, is sufficient to meet this goal. However, for some children, additional help is critical. Unfortunately, even the best-intended plans may go awry if educators must deal with challenging behavior that competes with effective intervention implementation.
The literature is replete with data-based information about interventions to reduce challenging behavior. Speech-language pathologists rely on these tactics to eliminate challenging behavior so that the services that they provide are effective. For example, a child may scream each time she is asked to complete a task. An intervention, time-out from attention, is selected because the literature has shown it to be effective in reducing tantrum behavior. However, in this instance the intervention does not work and the screaming intensifies. Why? Because in this instance, an intervention has been selected to address only the form of the challenging behavior (i.e., screaming) without also considering the function of the behavior. So what is this “function” concept and how can we assess it in order to design more effective interventions?
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