Supporting Positive Employment Outcomes for Individuals Who Use AAC As a result of innovative efforts by individuals who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) and their support teams, there are growing numbers of documented cases of employment success for individuals who use AAC. We review recent research on employment and AAC and discuss three key components for obtaining and ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2010
Supporting Positive Employment Outcomes for Individuals Who Use AAC
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David McNaughton
    Department of Educational and School Psychology and Special Education, and the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA
  • Anthony Arnold
    The Prentke-Romich Company, Grand Forks, ND
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2010
Supporting Positive Employment Outcomes for Individuals Who Use AAC
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, June 2010, Vol. 19, 51-59. doi:10.1044/aac19.2.51
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, June 2010, Vol. 19, 51-59. doi:10.1044/aac19.2.51
Abstract

As a result of innovative efforts by individuals who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) and their support teams, there are growing numbers of documented cases of employment success for individuals who use AAC. We review recent research on employment and AAC and discuss three key components for obtaining and maintaining employment: (a) developing employee knowledge and skills that are valued in the workplace, (b) identifying jobs that are a good match for the skills and interests of individuals who use AAC, and (c) ensuring that needed supports are available to maintain employment success.

I like to believe my transition to adulthood, independent living and employment started to happen on the day my parents learned of my diagnosis of cerebral palsy—they started taking me to therapies, and a preschool program, and to expand their expectations over time … the longer you put off educational and rehabilitation activities, the less likely it is that you will witness the things that you want …(Arnold, 2007, p.94)

Acknowledgment
The research reported here was supported in part by the Communication Enhancement Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center (AAC-RERC), which is funded by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research of the U.S. Department of Education under grant number #H133E080011. The opinions contained in this publication are those of the grantee and do not necessarily reflect those of the Department of Education. Additional information on the AAC-RERC is available at http://www.aac-rerc.com
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