What You Might Not Find in a Typical Transition Plan! Some Important Lessons From Adults Who Rely on Augmentative and Alternative Communication Increasingly, parents of students with complex communication needs have high expectations for life after school. To respond to these high expectations, professionals must ensure that, among other skills, these students have three key supports: (a) access to needed socially-valued adult vocabulary, (b) rich social networks, and (c) strategies to increase ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2010
What You Might Not Find in a Typical Transition Plan! Some Important Lessons From Adults Who Rely on Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Diane Nelson Bryen
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA
  • Yoosun Chung
    George Mason University, Fairfax, VA
  • Sarah Lever
    ISAAC, Charlotte, NC
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2010
What You Might Not Find in a Typical Transition Plan! Some Important Lessons From Adults Who Rely on Augmentative and Alternative Communication
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, June 2010, Vol. 19, 32-40. doi:10.1044/aac19.2.32
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, June 2010, Vol. 19, 32-40. doi:10.1044/aac19.2.32
Abstract

Increasingly, parents of students with complex communication needs have high expectations for life after school. To respond to these high expectations, professionals must ensure that, among other skills, these students have three key supports: (a) access to needed socially-valued adult vocabulary, (b) rich social networks, and (c) strategies to increase personal safety and to reduce the risk of becoming a victim of a crime. This paper provides both first-person accounts, as well as descriptions of the results of innovative strategies for the acquisition of skills needed for living full, active, and socially valued adult lives.

Acknowledgment
The research reported here was supported in part by the Communication Enhancement Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center (AAC-RERC), which is funded by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research of the U.S. Department of Education under grant number #H133E080011. The opinions contained in this publication are those of the grantee and do not necessarily reflect those of the Department of Education. Additional information on the AAC-RERC is available at http://www.aac-rerc.com
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