Clinical Impressions of How Young Children Use AAC at Home and in Child Care Settings: A Canadian Perspective Speech-language pathologists, working in a multicultural, community-based environment for young children with special needs in Vancouver, Canada, collected information on 84 clients using AAC from a chart review. The speech-language pathologists collected additional usage information and attended a group interview to discuss barriers and facilitators of AAC. Thirty-one percent of ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2010
Clinical Impressions of How Young Children Use AAC at Home and in Child Care Settings: A Canadian Perspective
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathryn Wishart
    British Columbia Centre for AbilityVancouver, BC, Canada
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2010
Clinical Impressions of How Young Children Use AAC at Home and in Child Care Settings: A Canadian Perspective
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, April 2010, Vol. 19, 21-28. doi:10.1044/aac19.1.21
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, April 2010, Vol. 19, 21-28. doi:10.1044/aac19.1.21
Abstract

Speech-language pathologists, working in a multicultural, community-based environment for young children with special needs in Vancouver, Canada, collected information on 84 clients using AAC from a chart review. The speech-language pathologists collected additional usage information and attended a group interview to discuss barriers and facilitators of AAC. Thirty-one percent of the children were using AAC. Children aged between 16 and 72 months typically relied on multiple modes of communication, including sign, communication boards and binders, and low- and high-tech communication devices. All of the children used at least one type of unaided mode. Fifty-five percent used pictures or communication boards/displays, and 29% used technology with speech output. Similarities in usage of AAC were noted in home and child-care settings with increased use of unaided in homes and a slightly increased use of aided communication in child care settings. Speech-language pathologists reported that the time needed for AAC intervention as well as limited funding for high-tech devices continue to be major barriers. Additional research is needed to describe current AAC practices with young children particularly from minority linguistic and cultural backgrounds. Stakeholder input is needed to explore perceptions of children's usage of AAC in daily life with familiar and unfamiliar communication partners.

Acknowledgments
Thank you to the 10 speech-language pathologists at BC Centre for Ability who participated in this study and to the children, families and caregivers who teach us so much.
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.