Theory-Driven AAC Practices With Adults Who Use Utterance-Based Systems: The Case of Conversational Rule Violations The purpose of this paper is to explore the pragmatic issue of when to use pre-constructed utterances by discussing a research project investigating messages that fail to meet either conventional standards of contextual appropriateness or timing. The use of pragmatic theory to systematically examine pre-constructed messages will be discussed, along ... Article
Article  |   September 01, 2009
Theory-Driven AAC Practices With Adults Who Use Utterance-Based Systems: The Case of Conversational Rule Violations
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Linda Hoag
    School of Family Studies and Human Services, Department of Computer and Information Sciences, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS
  • Jan Bedrosian
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI
  • Kathy McCoy
    University of Delaware, Newark, DE
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Normal Language Processing / Articles
Article   |   September 01, 2009
Theory-Driven AAC Practices With Adults Who Use Utterance-Based Systems: The Case of Conversational Rule Violations
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, September 2009, Vol. 18, 103-109. doi:10.1044/aac18.3.103
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, September 2009, Vol. 18, 103-109. doi:10.1044/aac18.3.103
Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to explore the pragmatic issue of when to use pre-constructed utterances by discussing a research project investigating messages that fail to meet either conventional standards of contextual appropriateness or timing. The use of pragmatic theory to systematically examine pre-constructed messages will be discussed, along with the outcomes of using messages that do not seem to follow pragmatic rules. The development of a hierarchy of types of rule violations will be described and the clinical implications of the hierarchy will be explored.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by grants (5 R01 DC03670-06) from the National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. The authors wish to thank their many consultants and graduate research assistants.
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