Case Studies of Intermediate Steps/Between AAC Evaluations and Implementation This article presents two case studies of children with complex communication needs, including a diagnosis of autism. Although different in age and overall diagnoses, both children primarily used behaviors, gestures, and limited overall vocalizations for communication. In each case, some pictures and signing had been intermittently incorporated into their school ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2008
Case Studies of Intermediate Steps/Between AAC Evaluations and Implementation
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sheela Stuart
    Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC
  • Christopher Ritthaler
    Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / School-Based Settings / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2008
Case Studies of Intermediate Steps/Between AAC Evaluations and Implementation
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, December 2008, Vol. 17, 150-155. doi:10.1044/aac17.4.150
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, December 2008, Vol. 17, 150-155. doi:10.1044/aac17.4.150
Abstract

This article presents two case studies of children with complex communication needs, including a diagnosis of autism. Although different in age and overall diagnoses, both children primarily used behaviors, gestures, and limited overall vocalizations for communication. In each case, some pictures and signing had been intermittently incorporated into their school programs with very little success. The school-based augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) teams had used the candidacy model and decided that, until the children made gains in cognition and behavior, they could not use any type of speech generating device. In each instance, the child's parent disagreed and requested a second AAC evaluation. The second opinion evaluating center incorporated Language Acquisition Though Motor Planning (LAMP) to utilize a speech generating device for participation in some motivating activities. Results were sufficiently positive to support trial use of this approach and private outpatient sessions were provided. The article includes a brief overview of the resulting journey: the give-and-take process between second opinion center, parents, and school to arrive at a form of successful communication for each child.

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