Linguistic Interactions: A Therapeutic Consideration for Adults With Aphasia Linguistic interaction models suggest that interrelationships arise between structural language components and between structural and pragmatic components when language is used in social contexts. The linguist, David Crystal (1986, 1987), has proposed that these relationships are central, not peripheral, to achieving desired clinical outcomes. For individuals with severe communication challenges, ... Article
Article  |   September 01, 2008
Linguistic Interactions: A Therapeutic Consideration for Adults With Aphasia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lynn E. Fox
    Portland State University, Portland, Oregon
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Articles
Article   |   September 01, 2008
Linguistic Interactions: A Therapeutic Consideration for Adults With Aphasia
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, September 2008, Vol. 17, 93-98. doi:10.1044/aac17.3.93
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, September 2008, Vol. 17, 93-98. doi:10.1044/aac17.3.93
Abstract

Linguistic interaction models suggest that interrelationships arise between structural language components and between structural and pragmatic components when language is used in social contexts. The linguist, David Crystal (1986, 1987), has proposed that these relationships are central, not peripheral, to achieving desired clinical outcomes. For individuals with severe communication challenges, erratic or unpredictable relationships between structural and pragmatic components can result in atypical patterns of interaction between them and members of their social communities, which may create a perception of disablement. This paper presents a case study of a woman with fluent, Wernicke's aphasia that illustrates how attention to patterns of linguistic interaction may enhance AAC intervention for adults with aphasia.

Acknowledgments
The author sincerely thanks H.B., her family, and friends for allowing their experiences to be the basis for this paper. Special thanks to Chris Miller, MA, CCC-SLP, who collaborated with the author on all aspects of the intervention and who created and led the Coffee Klatch. Thanks also to Jeff Gierer and Kim Turner for their fine work with H.B. and the Coffee Klatch group.
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