Linguistic Competence in Aphasia Loss of implicit linguistic competence assumes a loss of linguistic rules, necessary linguistic computations, or representations. In aphasia, the inherent neurological damage is frequently assumed by some to be a loss of implicit linguistic competence that has damaged or wiped out neural centers or pathways that are necessary for maintenance ... Article
Article  |   September 01, 2008
Linguistic Competence in Aphasia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Leonard L. LaPointe
    Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Articles
Article   |   September 01, 2008
Linguistic Competence in Aphasia
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, September 2008, Vol. 17, 87-92. doi:10.1044/aac17.3.87
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, September 2008, Vol. 17, 87-92. doi:10.1044/aac17.3.87
Abstract

Loss of implicit linguistic competence assumes a loss of linguistic rules, necessary linguistic computations, or representations. In aphasia, the inherent neurological damage is frequently assumed by some to be a loss of implicit linguistic competence that has damaged or wiped out neural centers or pathways that are necessary for maintenance of the language rules and representations needed to communicate. Not everyone agrees with this view of language use in aphasia. The measurement of implicit language competence, although apparently necessary and satisfying for theoretic linguistics, is complexly interwoven with performance factors. Transience, stimulability, and variability in aphasia language use provide evidence for an access deficit model that supports performance loss. Advances in understanding linguistic competence and performance may be informed by careful study of bilingual language acquisition and loss, the language of savants, the language of feral children, and advances in neuroimaging. Social models of aphasia treatment, coupled with an access deficit view of aphasia, can salve our restless minds and allow pursuit of maximum interactive communication goals even without a comfortable explanation of implicit linguistic competence in aphasia.

Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.