Communication Partner Interventions for Students Who Use AAC Research indicates that the communication skills of partners significantly influence the success of communicative interactions with individuals who use AAC. Frequently, partners have been reported to not provide supportive opportunities for communication when interacting with individuals who use AAC. In turn, individuals who use AAC have been documented to often ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2008
Communication Partner Interventions for Students Who Use AAC
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jennifer Kent-Walsh
    University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2008
Communication Partner Interventions for Students Who Use AAC
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, April 2008, Vol. 17, 27-32. doi:10.1044/aac17.1.27
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, April 2008, Vol. 17, 27-32. doi:10.1044/aac17.1.27
Abstract

Research indicates that the communication skills of partners significantly influence the success of communicative interactions with individuals who use AAC. Frequently, partners have been reported to not provide supportive opportunities for communication when interacting with individuals who use AAC. In turn, individuals who use AAC have been documented to often be passive communicators, particularly when they are at the beginning stages of developing communicative competence. Given the importance of effective communication skills in the school environment, it is essential that speech-language pathologists consider conducting partner interventions when working with school-age children with AAC needs. This article provides practical suggestions for speech-language pathologists by exploring (a) the range of communication partners who may benefit from partner interventions, (b) examples of interaction skills that can be targeted through partner interventions, and (c) a suggested protocol for communication partner interventions. By providing interventions for communication partners who are complimentary to interventions provided directly, it is possible for school SLPs to strengthen their approach to improving communication and educational outcomes for children with AAC needs.

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