Acquired Communication Disorders and Cognitive Deficits: AAC Intervention Challenges Following a stroke or a traumatic brain injury (TBI), survivors cling to the hope that the rehabilitation process will facilitate the return of natural speech. In contrast, individuals who receive a diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) grapple with the reality of eventually losing their natural speech. No matter ... Article
Article  |   September 01, 2010
Acquired Communication Disorders and Cognitive Deficits: AAC Intervention Challenges
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Aimee Dietz
    University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH
    guest editor
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   September 01, 2010
Acquired Communication Disorders and Cognitive Deficits: AAC Intervention Challenges
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, September 2010, Vol. 19, 62-63. doi:10.1044/aac19.3.62
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, September 2010, Vol. 19, 62-63. doi:10.1044/aac19.3.62
Following a stroke or a traumatic brain injury (TBI), survivors cling to the hope that the rehabilitation process will facilitate the return of natural speech. In contrast, individuals who receive a diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) grapple with the reality of eventually losing their natural speech. No matter whether people find themselves dealing with the chronicity of stroke- and TBI-related deficits or the degenerative nature of ALS, speech-language pathologists (SLPs) play a pivotal role in helping them achieve communicative competence. In order to achieve this goal, SLPs frequently employ AAC interventions; however, the cognitive-linguistic deficits associated with TBI, stroke, and ALS may thwart these efforts. This issue of Perspectives addresses some of the cognitive-linguistic challenges commonly experienced by SLPs designing and implementing AAC interventions for people with ALS, individuals with aphasia, and TBI survivors.
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