Providing Quality AAC Intervention Services to Very Young Children: Research and Recommended Practice Effective early intervention services and supports are based on practices that are family centered, culturally responsive, developmentally supportive, and collaborative in nature (Sandall, Hemmeter, Maclean, & Smith, 2004). The provision of early communication services and supports within this framework can lead to improved communicative outcomes for young children and ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2007
Providing Quality AAC Intervention Services to Very Young Children: Research and Recommended Practice
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Melissa A. Cheslock
    Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA
  • MaryAnn Romski
    Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA
  • Rose Sevcik
    Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2007
Providing Quality AAC Intervention Services to Very Young Children: Research and Recommended Practice
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, April 2007, Vol. 16, 2-6. doi:10.1044/aac16.1.2
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, April 2007, Vol. 16, 2-6. doi:10.1044/aac16.1.2
Effective early intervention services and supports are based on practices that are family centered, culturally responsive, developmentally supportive, and collaborative in nature (Sandall, Hemmeter, Maclean, & Smith, 2004). The provision of early communication services and supports within this framework can lead to improved communicative outcomes for young children and families. For more than 3 decades, the field of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) has addressed the communication needs of children who cannot consistently rely on speech for functional communication (Beukelman & Mirenda, 2005). Along with technological advances that support AAC, there have been developments in the empirical knowledge base including new approaches in decision making for clinical assessment and intervention. In particular, research has shown that AAC can be used as part of language intervention strategies to develop children's speech and language skills. This research—coupled with current policy, values, and perspectives of families and professionals and clinical expertise—provides the foundation on which speech-language pathologists (SLPs) make quality intervention decisions. In this article, we provide information about the current knowledge base and recommended practices for working with very young children in the emerging stage of language development engaged in AAC intervention.
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