Aided AAC Intervention for Children With Suspected Childhood Apraxia of Speech Children with severe motor-speech disorders, particularly those with suspected childhood apraxia of speech (CAS), have long presented significant challenges for speech-language pathologists (SLPs). (An ASHA ad hoc committee is currently constructing a position statement and comprehensive technical report on CAS which is due for release this year). Due to ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2007
Aided AAC Intervention for Children With Suspected Childhood Apraxia of Speech
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cathy Binger
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2007
Aided AAC Intervention for Children With Suspected Childhood Apraxia of Speech
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, April 2007, Vol. 16, 10-12. doi:10.1044/aac16.1.10
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, April 2007, Vol. 16, 10-12. doi:10.1044/aac16.1.10
Children with severe motor-speech disorders, particularly those with suspected childhood apraxia of speech (CAS), have long presented significant challenges for speech-language pathologists (SLPs). (An ASHA ad hoc committee is currently constructing a position statement and comprehensive technical report on CAS which is due for release this year). Due to challenges with diagnosing this disorder, the committee recommends using the term suspected CAS (ASHA, in press, 2007). Children with suspected CAS not only exhibit compromised intelligibility but also subsequent communication frustrations, challenging behaviors, learned passivity, compromised social interactions, and delayed language development (e.g., Binger et al., 2006; Binger & Light, 2007; Cumley & Swanson, 1999; Harris, Doyle, & Haaf, 1996; Waller et al., 2001). Given the impact that suspected CAS has not only on speech but also on behavioral, pragmatic, and language skills, a two-pronged approach to intervention is warranted for children with suspected CAS. First, all children with CAS require ongoing, intensive speech therapy to improve their speech skills. In addition, many children may benefit from augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) solutions to address both their immediate and longer-term functional communication needs (ASHA, in press, 2007).
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