Literacy Learning: An Intervention for Children With Autism For decades, professionals have been challenged to find a way into the world of children with autism in order to teach them needed skills. Historically, skills related to the understanding of language and social reciprocity has been particularly resistant to change, which is problematic given that these two deficit ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2007
Literacy Learning: An Intervention for Children With Autism
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan H. Norwell
    Private Practice, Buffalo Grove, IL
Article Information
Development / Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / Normal Language Processing / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   August 01, 2007
Literacy Learning: An Intervention for Children With Autism
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, August 2007, Vol. 16, 8-18. doi:10.1044/aac16.2.8
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, August 2007, Vol. 16, 8-18. doi:10.1044/aac16.2.8
For decades, professionals have been challenged to find a way into the world of children with autism in order to teach them needed skills. Historically, skills related to the understanding of language and social reciprocity has been particularly resistant to change, which is problematic given that these two deficit areas are the cornerstone of the diagnosis of autism itself.
Equally challenging is finding a viable way out for children with autism, a way to communicate their inner thoughts and desires. This is most obvious when working with children who are nonverbal or less than typically verbal. It has been estimated that 50% of children with autism will not develop enough speech for functional communication (Romski & Sevcik, 1996). For them, augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) is a viable avenue for expressive and receptive language learning and yet there is limited documentation as to best practice for the use of AAC for this population. In addition, there is a limited broad-based body of research on literacy and autism and the research for developing literacy skills for children with autism who use AAC is almost nonexistent.
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