Autism Spectrum Disorders and Augmentative and Alternative Communication: From Research to Practice Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) are subjects that have generated and continue to generate great discussion and controversy. There is hardly an AAC practitioner who has not been challenged by the communication needs of an individual with ASD. And the numbers of these mystifying ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2007
Autism Spectrum Disorders and Augmentative and Alternative Communication: From Research to Practice
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joanne M. Cafiero
    Frederick County Public Schools Autism Cadre and Cafiero Communications Associates, Rockville, MD
  • Marsha Acheson
    Assistive Technology, Cincinnati Public Schools.
  • Joseph E. Zins
    University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / Articles
Article   |   August 01, 2007
Autism Spectrum Disorders and Augmentative and Alternative Communication: From Research to Practice
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, August 2007, Vol. 16, 3-8. doi:10.1044/aac16.2.3
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, August 2007, Vol. 16, 3-8. doi:10.1044/aac16.2.3
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) are subjects that have generated and continue to generate great discussion and controversy. There is hardly an AAC practitioner who has not been challenged by the communication needs of an individual with ASD. And the numbers of these mystifying individuals continues to increase, with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention stating that the current prevalence of ASD is 1 in every 150 8-year olds in multiple areas of the United States (2007). Practitioners must deal with the exciting, but still emerging, research to practice models for AAC. At the same time, practitioners are limited by the knowledge gap concerning the precise nature of the language disability in ASD and how to address it. Fortunately, Congress passed the Combating Autism Act in 2006. This Act represents a 50% increase in funding for research in understanding, preventing and treating ASD.
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