Evidence-Based Practice and Research Support for the Use of Speech Generating Devices as a Functional Communication Mode for Individuals With Autism Individuals with autism frequently exhibit deficiencies in effectively communicating with others. In cases where individuals with autism use speech to communicate, the speech may not be meaningful (i.e., echolalic or repetitive in nature). Individuals with autism who are not able to use speech may reach for, or point to, ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2007
Evidence-Based Practice and Research Support for the Use of Speech Generating Devices as a Functional Communication Mode for Individuals With Autism
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Maureen M. Schepis
    Private Practice (Applied Behavioral Consultant), Morganton, NC
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / Evidence-Based Practice
Article   |   August 01, 2007
Evidence-Based Practice and Research Support for the Use of Speech Generating Devices as a Functional Communication Mode for Individuals With Autism
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, August 2007, Vol. 16, 18-21. doi:10.1044/aac16.2.18
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, August 2007, Vol. 16, 18-21. doi:10.1044/aac16.2.18
Individuals with autism frequently exhibit deficiencies in effectively communicating with others. In cases where individuals with autism use speech to communicate, the speech may not be meaningful (i.e., echolalic or repetitive in nature). Individuals with autism who are not able to use speech may reach for, or point to, objects, but frequently these types of communicative responses are not acknowledged by communication partners unfamiliar with the individual. Pointing or reaching for an object as a form of communication is also somewhat limiting in that the communication is only emitted in the presence of the object. As a result of using ineffective communication modes, individuals with autism may receive reduced opportunities to engage in social interactions and have limited opportunities to develop meaningful relationships. Additionally, given the interactive nature of the development of language and literacy, an individual with autism who communicates in unconventional ways may not be able to fully participate in opportunities to learn new skills.
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