Documentation in AAC Using Goal Attainment Scaling Data collection to measure therapy progress is challenging for novice AAC service providers as well as for many experienced professionals. The subtle changes that represent progress for many people with complex communication needs who use AAC are often hard to chart. Yet, documenting progress is an integral part of ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2007
Documentation in AAC Using Goal Attainment Scaling
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elizabeth K. Hanson
    University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2007
Documentation in AAC Using Goal Attainment Scaling
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, December 2007, Vol. 16, 6-9. doi:10.1044/aac16.4.6
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, December 2007, Vol. 16, 6-9. doi:10.1044/aac16.4.6
Data collection to measure therapy progress is challenging for novice AAC service providers as well as for many experienced professionals. The subtle changes that represent progress for many people with complex communication needs who use AAC are often hard to chart. Yet, documenting progress is an integral part of the intervention process. Who can imagine Medicaid or school administrators doing without a report of progress toward goals and objectives?
Would it surprise you to learn that we are not alone in this clinical documentation dilemma? Other fields that deal with functional behavioral changes in context find it equally difficult to measure change and report progress toward goal attainment. Enter Kiresuk and Sherman (1968)  who grappled with these same issues in the mental health field and developed a solution called “goal attainment scaling.” Referred to by its acronym, GAS, this method is used to measure behavioral change by practitioners in mental health, geriatrics, early intervention, occupational therapy, and more recently, speech-language therapy (Cusick, McIntyre, Novak, Lannin, & Lowe, 2006; Hurn, Kneebone, & Cropley, 2006; Kiresuk, Smith, & Cardillo, 1994; Rockwood, Fay, Song, MacKnight, & Gorman, 2006; McLaren & Rodger, 2003; Sohlberg, Fickas, Ehlhardt, & Todis, 2005; Stewart, Law, Russell, & Hanna, 2004).
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