AAC From a Parent's Perspective When I talk with other parents of children who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), the most frequent question I hear is, “How can I get the speech-language pathologist (SLP) and the classroom teacher to work with my child on AAC?” When I talk with SLPs, they often ask ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2007
AAC From a Parent's Perspective
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robin Hurd
    AAC Institute, Fairview, PA
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2007
AAC From a Parent's Perspective
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, December 2007, Vol. 16, 12-14. doi:10.1044/aac16.4.12
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, December 2007, Vol. 16, 12-14. doi:10.1044/aac16.4.12
When I talk with other parents of children who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), the most frequent question I hear is, “How can I get the speech-language pathologist (SLP) and the classroom teacher to work with my child on AAC?” When I talk with SLPs, they often ask me, “How can I get parents to accept their child's AAC device?”
In my role as the parent support liaison for the AAC Institute, I work with many parents and interact with many professionals at conferences and training events, and these types of comments are very common. It is interesting to me that two different groups of people are asking basically the same questions about each other! When I think about why this is happening, my conclusion is this: parents and professionals have very different expectations for what AAC will do for a child who needs it. ASHA's “Roles and Responsibilities of Speech-Language Pathologists with Respect to Augmentative and Alternative Communication: Position Statement” states that SLPs must “Integrate perspectives, knowledge and skills of team members, especially those individuals who have AAC needs, their families, and significant others…” However, too often professionals do not clearly understand the values of families whose children use AAC. In this article, I will provide some input into what families think is important for their children who use AAC.
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