Preparing Pre-professional Students in Evidence Influenced Intervention Decision-Making This article summarizes a presentation at Division 12's Evidence-based Practice (EBP) Conference in 2007 that focused on preparing pre-professional students for their potential roles in AAC intervention decision-making. The three-factor EBP definition for AAC proposed by Schlosser and Raghavendra (2004)  was utilized for this presentation. This multi-factor approach ... Article
Article  |   September 01, 2007
Preparing Pre-professional Students in Evidence Influenced Intervention Decision-Making
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David R. Beukelman
    University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE
    Munroe-Meyer Institute for Genetics and Rehabilitation Institute for Rehabilitation Science and Engineering, Omaha, NE
  • Sarah E. Wallace
    University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Lincoln, NE
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Evidence-Based Practice
Article   |   September 01, 2007
Preparing Pre-professional Students in Evidence Influenced Intervention Decision-Making
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, September 2007, Vol. 16, 20-23. doi:10.1044/aac16.3.20
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, September 2007, Vol. 16, 20-23. doi:10.1044/aac16.3.20
This article summarizes a presentation at Division 12's Evidence-based Practice (EBP) Conference in 2007 that focused on preparing pre-professional students for their potential roles in AAC intervention decision-making.
The three-factor EBP definition for AAC proposed by Schlosser and Raghavendra (2004)  was utilized for this presentation. This multi-factor approach acknowledges that AAC intervention decision-making is influenced by (a) the intervention evidence base, (b) recognized intervention practice, and (c) the perspectives of individuals who rely on AAC and those close to them.
Three roles related to EBP were discussed in the presentation. The first role is that of completing and reporting intervention research upon which intervention decision-making can be based. The AAC field presents some unique challenges in this area. Those who rely on AAC strategies are heterogeneous with regard to age, diagnostic condition, profile of capability (i.e., strengths and limitations), profile of barriers to effective communication, and contexts in which they live and participate. Also, AAC technology options change regularly. In addition, AAC strategies require considerable learning and practice to develop expertise and, therefore, do not lend themselves to comparative research strategies. Finally, most persons who rely on AAC are served by clinicians and educators who typically do not have the time or expertise to complete intervention research independently. Furthermore, researchers typically work in settings that do not serve sufficient numbers of persons who rely on AAC and consequently cannot complete intervention research without collaborative relationships with individuals in intervention settings.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.