AAC Use and Communicative Improvements in Chronic Aphasia: Evidence Comparing Global With Severe Broca's Aphasia This paper derives from a poster at the Division 12 Conference on Evidence-Based Practice in AAC held in San Antonio, TX, earlier this year. That presentation gave quantitative data comparing impairment-level improvements and functional communication improvements documented among speechgenerating-device (SGD) users in the chronic stage of severe aphasia. The ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2006
AAC Use and Communicative Improvements in Chronic Aphasia: Evidence Comparing Global With Severe Broca's Aphasia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Richard D. Steele
    Lingraphicare, Inc., Princeton, NJ
    Computer Science Department, Eastern Washington University, Cheney, WA
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2006
AAC Use and Communicative Improvements in Chronic Aphasia: Evidence Comparing Global With Severe Broca's Aphasia
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, December 2006, Vol. 15, 18-22. doi:10.1044/aac15.4.18
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, December 2006, Vol. 15, 18-22. doi:10.1044/aac15.4.18
This paper derives from a poster at the Division 12 Conference on Evidence-Based Practice in AAC held in San Antonio, TX, earlier this year. That presentation gave quantitative data comparing impairment-level improvements and functional communication improvements documented among speechgenerating-device (SGD) users in the chronic stage of severe aphasia. The goal of this paper is to expand on materials presented there, highlighting key findings from those data analyses, while exploring their significance through observations drawn from associated clinical experience.
Discussions in the literature of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) identify three important, complementary ways in which AAC tools, materials, and methods are used with benefit in communicative transactions by persons with speech-language impairments. They are (a) replacement of speech where communicatively needed, (b) scaffolding or supplementation that enhances communicative effectiveness, and (c) facilitating the re/acquisition of speech for effective communicative use (Garrett, 1998; Hux, Manasse, Weiss, & Beukelman, 2001). Each of these is observed across the spectrum of AAC users, etiologies, ages, and AAC approaches, though the importance of—and preference for—each varies by user, situation, and goals. In this article, we will focus on one particular type of AAC user: adults with chronic, acquired, severe aphasia, more specifically those with global aphasia and severe Broca's aphasia. We discuss in some detail their observed uses of the Lingraphica Speech Generating Device (SGD) and the various documented benefits accruing in consequence.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.