Evidence-Based Practice: A Roadmap to Intervention Although the field of evidence-based practice in medicine has exploded in recent years, it has been criticized as prescriptive, dictating an explicit set of rules. The analogue frequently used is of a cookbook for clinical practice. However, it may be more appropriate to use the analogue of a roadmap ... Article
Article  |   September 01, 2006
Evidence-Based Practice: A Roadmap to Intervention
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathryn M. Yorkston
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Evidence-Based Practice
Article   |   September 01, 2006
Evidence-Based Practice: A Roadmap to Intervention
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, September 2006, Vol. 15, 6-8. doi:10.1044/aac15.3.6
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, September 2006, Vol. 15, 6-8. doi:10.1044/aac15.3.6
Although the field of evidence-based practice in medicine has exploded in recent years, it has been criticized as prescriptive, dictating an explicit set of rules. The analogue frequently used is of a cookbook for clinical practice. However, it may be more appropriate to use the analogue of a roadmap for planning intervention. At times, EBP reviews aid in specific decisions, as one would use a road map when standing at the intersection of two highways and trying to decide whether to go left or right. At other times, EBP reviews provide a bird's eye view for long-term planning, perhaps by preventing the traveler from getting lost on the long trip from Seattle to Denver or mapping the most appropriate steps toward the long-term goal of regaining functional natural speech following severe traumatic brain injury. In still another example, the road maps may assist clinical researchers in planning future research directions. Consider the case of a traveler on one side of a river seeing the destination on the other side of the river. If there is a convenient route, it will be apparent on a current map; if not, the need for a future bridge may become apparent. EBP reviews and guidelines may help to identify the clinical bridges that need to be built—bridges that will get us to our clinical destination in an efficient manner.
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