Supplementing Residual Speech With High-Tech AAC Many individuals with significant speech disorders prefer to use their residual speech to communicate. Occasionally, however, these speakers need to augment their speech by using low-tech strategies in order to be understood. Such strategies may include pointing to a word or first letter of a word on a topic board. ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2005
Supplementing Residual Speech With High-Tech AAC
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Bill Geluso
    AAC-RERC Writers Brigade, Oyster Bay, NY
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2005
Supplementing Residual Speech With High-Tech AAC
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, December 2005, Vol. 14, 5-6. doi:10.1044/aac14.4.5
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, December 2005, Vol. 14, 5-6. doi:10.1044/aac14.4.5
Many individuals with significant speech disorders prefer to use their residual speech to communicate. Occasionally, however, these speakers need to augment their speech by using low-tech strategies in order to be understood. Such strategies may include pointing to a word or first letter of a word on a topic board.
Although research documents the effectiveness of these low-tech strategies for supplementing residual speech, such methods can place a significant burden on familiar partners and often preclude interactions with less familiar partners (Beukelman & Mirenda, 2005). During a conversation, for example, if a speaker says a word that the partner does not understand, the speaker might give clues to that word by pointing to its first few letters on an alphabet board. For these clues to be useful, the partner must first position himself to see the board and then pay close attention to observe where the speaker is pointing. This process can hinder the natural flow of a conversation. Also, less familiar partners may not be willing or know how to communicate in this fashion. To address this issue, researchers are developing a high-tech AAC device that will allow individuals to supplement their natural speech with information that listeners can easily see and comprehend.
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