The Aging Process and the Affect on Successful AAC Use World wide there is an increase in the aging population. By 2020, the number of people over 60 years of age will exceed 1,000 million, and of that number, 300 million will be living in the United States, with the projected number of people over 85 years reaching at least ... Article
Article  |   September 01, 2005
The Aging Process and the Affect on Successful AAC Use
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gary D. Cumley
    University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, Stevens Point, WI
  • Sheela Stuart
    Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Articles
Article   |   September 01, 2005
The Aging Process and the Affect on Successful AAC Use
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, September 2005, Vol. 14, 22-25. doi:10.1044/aac14.3.22
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, September 2005, Vol. 14, 22-25. doi:10.1044/aac14.3.22
World wide there is an increase in the aging population. By 2020, the number of people over 60 years of age will exceed 1,000 million, and of that number, 300 million will be living in the United States, with the projected number of people over 85 years reaching at least 7 million. By 2040, which is approximately when the baby boomers reach 85 years of age, this number is expected to double (Worrall & Hickson, 2003). Obviously, there is an increasing demand for services to meet the needs of aging adults.
Aging is not a disease or disability; however, growing older is associated with an increase in the likelihood of disease and/or disability or both. In the United States, the most common diseases of people over the age of 65 are heart disease, stroke, and cancer. The most common chronic conditions of old age are arthritis, hypertension, hearing and visual impairments. All of these chronic conditions have direct implications for the management of older people with communication disabilities (Worrall & Hickson, 2003).
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