End-of-Life Issues for People Who Use AAC End-of-life issues for families and adults who use AAC were discussed by the following professionals at the 2005 Division 12 Leadership Conference: Lisa Bardach, Melanie Fried-Oken, Candace Ganz, Katya Hill, Mary Ann Lowe, Janis Nicol, Jill Tullman, and Lore Young. Collaboratively, we conducted qualitative research using an evidence-based practice paradigm ... Article
Article  |   September 01, 2005
End-of-Life Issues for People Who Use AAC
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Melanie Fried-Oken
    Oregon Health and Sciences University, Portland, OR
  • Lisa Bardach
    Communicating Solutions, LLC, Ann Arbor, MI
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Articles
Article   |   September 01, 2005
End-of-Life Issues for People Who Use AAC
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, September 2005, Vol. 14, 15-19. doi:10.1044/aac14.3.15
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, September 2005, Vol. 14, 15-19. doi:10.1044/aac14.3.15
End-of-life issues for families and adults who use AAC were discussed by the following professionals at the 2005 Division 12 Leadership Conference: Lisa Bardach, Melanie Fried-Oken, Candace Ganz, Katya Hill, Mary Ann Lowe, Janis Nicol, Jill Tullman, and Lore Young. Collaboratively, we conducted qualitative research using an evidence-based practice paradigm with personal quotes from a variety of users. We identified key issues related to end-of-life for people who use AAC and established a research agenda that was submitted at the Division 12 leadership conference to all participants.
Schlosser and Raghavendra (2004)  define evidence- based practice for AAC as “the integration of best and current research evidence with clinical/educational expertise and relevant stakeholder perspectives, in order to facilitate decisions about assessment and intervention that are deemed effective and efficient for a given direct stakeholder” (p. 3). Within their decision-making framework, we gathered research evidence to inform practice. Specifically, we asked questions, selected evidence sources, executed the search strategy, and examined and synthesized the evidence. Our evidence came from two sources: personal and external data. The personal data were values expressed by individuals who rely on AAC and their significant others. Clients and significant others were asked to comment on the impact AAC had on their lives. The external evidence included research hypotheses and formulation of meaningful, value-based questions that lead to professional expertise in service delivery (Hill & Romich, 2004).
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