A Consultative Model for AAC/AT Support: A Team Approach Alice (not her real name) is a little girl who, when in kindergarten, did not interact with other children. She talked in scripted speech and otherwise did not participate in curriculum activities or play. Once placed in an environment with augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) options that included the use ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2005
A Consultative Model for AAC/AT Support: A Team Approach
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Vicky McKamy
    Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD
  • Jacquelyn R. Moore
    Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / School-Based Settings / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2005
A Consultative Model for AAC/AT Support: A Team Approach
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, June 2005, Vol. 14, 16-20. doi:10.1044/aac14.2.16
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, June 2005, Vol. 14, 16-20. doi:10.1044/aac14.2.16
Alice (not her real name) is a little girl who, when in kindergarten, did not interact with other children. She talked in scripted speech and otherwise did not participate in curriculum activities or play. Once placed in an environment with augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) options that included the use of Picture Communication Symbols (PCS) overlays and voice output with dynamic screen displays, her world of communication turned around. Now, in first grade, she is communicating in sentences using AAC strategies, participating in all of the curriculum activities, and interacting with her peers.
School-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are serving students with a wider variety of communication needs than ever before. Any given school can present varying models of delivery of special education services on the educational continuum from self-contained classrooms to full inclusion. In many school districts, there seems to be a move away from the itinerant SLP positions to having one SLP who is school-based and, therefore, serves the all speech and language needs of all students. This means they have to be all things to all kids, providing services to children with a range of disabilities from mild articulation disorders to children who are nonverbal and may have multiple needs.
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