Assessing the School-Aged Child for AAC Many school-aged children with a wide range of diagnoses including cerebral palsy, Down’s syndrome, oral apraxia, developmental delay, PDD-autism, and apraxia demonstrate severe limitations in their expressive communication performance such that they can benefit from the use of an augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) system. According to ASHA (2003), 51% ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2005
Assessing the School-Aged Child for AAC
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joan Bruno
    Children's Specialized Hospital, Mountainside, NJ
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2005
Assessing the School-Aged Child for AAC
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, April 2005, Vol. 14, 3-7. doi:10.1044/aac14.1.3
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, April 2005, Vol. 14, 3-7. doi:10.1044/aac14.1.3
Many school-aged children with a wide range of diagnoses including cerebral palsy, Down’s syndrome, oral apraxia, developmental delay, PDD-autism, and apraxia demonstrate severe limitations in their expressive communication performance such that they can benefit from the use of an augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) system. According to ASHA (2003), 51% of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) working in the schools reported that they work with a child who is unable to speak and/or who could benefit from AAC. As such, there is a need for SLPs working within schools to understand the critical components of an AAC system and the scope and process of performing an AAC evaluation with school-aged children.
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