Re-thinking Access to AAC Technologies for Young Children: Simplifying the Learning Demands Young children with complex communication needs are at risk in all aspects of development—functional communication, language, cognition, literacy, social interaction, and overall quality of life. Early intervention is essential to establish channels of communication to maximize learning. Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems offer the potential to enhance communication, facilitate ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2004
Re-thinking Access to AAC Technologies for Young Children: Simplifying the Learning Demands
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Janice Light
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Penn State University, University Park, PA
  • Kathryn Drager
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Penn State University, University Park, PA
Article Information
Development / Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2004
Re-thinking Access to AAC Technologies for Young Children: Simplifying the Learning Demands
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, April 2004, Vol. 13, 5-12. doi:10.1044/aac13.1.5
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, April 2004, Vol. 13, 5-12. doi:10.1044/aac13.1.5
Young children with complex communication needs are at risk in all aspects of development—functional communication, language, cognition, literacy, social interaction, and overall quality of life. Early intervention is essential to establish channels of communication to maximize learning. Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems offer the potential to enhance communication, facilitate language development, and improve learning outcomes. To date, however, this potential has not been fully realized. In order to maximize outcomes, we must provide AAC systems that offer young children tremendous power of communication and, at the same time, impose minimal learning demands, so that children can learn to use them effectively at a young age.
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