New Access Options for Head Pointing Head pointing access for AAC strategies is a form of direct selection that provides many individuals with an alternative to scanning. When an individual’s motoric impairments are so severe that they cannot point with their hands or feet, the option is typically switch-activated scanning. There are many reasons why ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2004
New Access Options for Head Pointing
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan Fager
    Institute for Rehabilitation Science and Engineering at Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital, Lincoln, NE
  • David Beukelman
    Institute for Rehabilitation Science and Engineering at Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital, Lincoln, NE
    University of Nebraska, Lincoln
    University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha
  • Laura Ball
    University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha
  • Tom Jakobs
    InvoTek Inc., Alma, AR
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2004
New Access Options for Head Pointing
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, April 2004, Vol. 13, 16-20. doi:10.1044/aac13.1.16
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, April 2004, Vol. 13, 16-20. doi:10.1044/aac13.1.16
Acknowledgements
The authors wish to thank the evaluation and field test participants and their families, caregivers and intervention specialists for their support of our work. We also acknowledge the assistance of our research support teams including Cara Ullman, Melanie Brimer, Barret Ewing, and Kristin Maassen.
The safe laser access project described was supported by Grant Number 5R42HD35779 from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the (NICHD).
The absolute head tracking project described is supported by a Phase-2 SBIR grant from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the (NIDRR).
The authors wish to acknowledge the ongoing support of the Rehabilitation Engineering and Research Center in Communication Enhancement which is funded by NIDRR of the U.S. Department of Education (H133E98G026).
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.